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Offline cornsqeezins  
#1 Posted : Thursday, November 08, 2012 9:36:12 AM(UTC)
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I found a mash recipe that calls for Barley Malt. I see where Brewhaus has many malts for sale, are these barley malts?
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Offline admin  
#2 Posted : Thursday, November 08, 2012 10:43:16 AM(UTC)
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2-Row, 6-Row, Distiller's Malt, Golden Promise, and Peated Malt are all barley malts.
Offline cornsqeezins  
#3 Posted : Thursday, November 08, 2012 11:18:22 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Admin Go to Quoted Post
2-Row, 6-Row, Distiller's Malt, Golden Promise, and Peated Malt are all barley malts.

Thank you for the info
Offline Bushy  
#4 Posted : Thursday, November 08, 2012 1:12:00 PM(UTC)
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Hey Rick is that Peated malt smoked with Irish Peat or Scottish Peat?
Offline admin  
#5 Posted : Thursday, November 08, 2012 2:59:48 PM(UTC)
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The Peated Malt is from Simpson's in Scotland, so I have to assume (but only assume) Scottish Peat.
Offline cornsqeezins  
#6 Posted : Thursday, November 08, 2012 3:03:32 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Bushy Go to Quoted Post
Hey Rick is that Peated malt smoked with Irish Peat or Scottish Peat?

The recipe just said barley malt.
Offline ohyeahyeah  
#7 Posted : Thursday, November 08, 2012 3:24:58 PM(UTC)
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"Whats the recipe? Inquiring minds want to know.

I think barley malt likely refers to liquid extract, as opposed to malted barley which refers to grain that has been malted."
Offline Crabby Krausen  
#8 Posted : Thursday, November 08, 2012 11:52:13 PM(UTC)
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i believe that malt referes to anything with malt capability( that is in any form after having been through the malting process))--liquid or grain,, could be barley or maybe rye etc.
Offline Crabby Krausen  
#9 Posted : Thursday, November 08, 2012 11:54:56 PM(UTC)
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"
Originally Posted by: Bushy Go to Quoted Post
Hey Rick is that Peated malt smoked with Irish Peat or Scottish Peat?


I dont know much about whiskey Bushey but does irish whiskey come with the smoked whatever like scotch?? if that makes sense!!!"
Offline Mkjt88  
#10 Posted : Friday, November 09, 2012 12:04:41 AM(UTC)
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"Crabby as far as I know.. From Irish Scottish to bourbon.. After the grains are malted they are kiln dried using peat for the fuel. All my research I've ever gathered stated this. Now if your interested in a specific whiskey maybe research how its made it could be different but seems the Peat is industry standard for what I've researched anyway.

Is this what you were asking?"
Offline ohyeahyeah  
#11 Posted : Friday, November 09, 2012 12:14:45 AM(UTC)
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Scotch and Irish both use peat for their kilns but with irish the grain is not exposed to the smoke so there is no transfer of the peat flavor like with scotch.
Offline scotty  
#12 Posted : Friday, November 09, 2012 12:56:54 AM(UTC)
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OOPS forgot to press the post key.

In short thanks for the reminder. I had forgotten too.
Offline scotty  
#13 Posted : Friday, November 09, 2012 1:09:41 AM(UTC)
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"
Originally Posted by: Mkjt88 Go to Quoted Post
Crabby as far as I know.. From Irish Scottish to bourbon.. After the grains are malted they are kiln dried using peat for the fuel. All my research I've ever gathered stated this. Now if your interested in a specific whiskey maybe research how its made it could be different but seems the Peat is industry standard for what I've researched anyway.

Is this what you were asking?


Oh yeah answered my question but Irish whiskey is my main objective.
I have found a basic grain bill of
malted barley
unmalted barley
rye
wheat
oats Unless you want a single malt

I have to look for the percentages-- i seem to have misplaced the bill-- im redecorating and even re installing stuff on my computer

All i remember is 1 pound each of the rye-wheat and oats oh yea 10 pounds malted barley and 5 pounds unmalted barley all crushed naturally. I mashed in about 10 gallons of water then drained and sparged to get about 9 gallons so that after fermenting, racking, clearing and racking again i would get 8 gallons for my boiler. Tripple distilled as irish whiskey demands.

Thats all i think i remember."
Offline Bushy  
#14 Posted : Friday, November 09, 2012 3:36:35 AM(UTC)
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Thasnks Rick, I guess I'll have to order some for my next whisky run.
Offline cornsqeezins  
#15 Posted : Friday, November 09, 2012 9:14:23 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: ohyeahyeah Go to Quoted Post
Whats the recipe? Inquiring minds want to know.

I think barley malt likely refers to liquid extract, as opposed to malted barley which refers to grain that has been malted.


Recipe was off of Claw Hammer Supplies website.
Offline Bushy  
#16 Posted : Friday, November 09, 2012 12:21:30 PM(UTC)
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"
Originally Posted by: cornsqeezins Go to Quoted Post
I found a mash recipe that calls for Barley Malt. I see where Brewhaus has many malts for sale, are these barley malts?
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Hey cornsqueezins that still looks like it's from the 1930's or before. If it's soldered together you may want to check for lead content.
Also I'd like to know what the gooseneck on the lyne arm is made from. It looks copper flex pipe."
Offline cornsqeezins  
#17 Posted : Friday, November 09, 2012 1:34:19 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Bushy Go to Quoted Post
Hey cornsqueezins that still looks like it's from the 1930's or before. If it's soldered together you may want to check for lead content.
Also I'd like to know what the gooseneck on the lyne arm is made from. It looks copper flex pipe.


It's not flex pipe, actually the copper was crimped this way to form the shape, not sure how they did it, I've never seen that type of work before on copper or any other metal. The still was originally from Kentucky, family origin. I would guess the 1930's would be fairly accurate for the age
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Offline heeler  
#18 Posted : Friday, November 09, 2012 10:32:01 PM(UTC)
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Just a word of warning....most stills of that age had lead soldier used in the construction and today we know better. I dont think silver soldier was invented that far back because we did'nt have OSHA or the FDA. I bet if you test that soldier ( but I dont know how) I bet you would find lead. I'm sure you can buy some acid lead test kit and go that route. Dont take a chance on cancer just for making likker. Research the possibilities of such and maybe use a different distillation unit. Safety first then hooch.
Offline Outland  
#19 Posted : Saturday, November 10, 2012 1:51:03 AM(UTC)
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I agree with Heeler, please check for lead: 3M makes this : http://leadcheck.com/ dunno the cost. This one is a DIY using sodium sulphide : http://www.sashas.net/im...nts/doc_lead_reveal.pdf.

Not definitive but a quicky test is that lead-free solder melts at a higher temperature than leaded solder.
Offline ohyeahyeah  
#20 Posted : Saturday, November 10, 2012 4:09:00 AM(UTC)
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Checking out the recipes on that site i see they call for "crushed malted barley".
Any of the malted barley the Admin listed will work, personally i would go with the second one listed, 6 row.
You could try substituting 1.5lb of the flaked maize for 1.5lb or rye or wheat if you are looking for more of a bourbon flavor profile.
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