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#1 Posted : Wednesday, March 26, 2014 7:30:10 PM(UTC)
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They produce this at George Washington's estate on a seasonal basis and it's not cheap either. $160 bucks per 750 ML bottle. They held a tasting and it was a pretty good whiskey. It was real smooth, but it had a spicy note to it due to the rye. Here's what you'll need:

6 pounds of Flaked Rye
3.5 pounds of Flaked Maize
1/2 a pound of malted barley (ground)
1 teaspoon of gypsum
1 teaspoon of citric acid blend
5 Gallons of water
3 pieces of cheesecloth
6 yeast packs/yeast starter


In a large stock pot, bring half of your water to a low boil and add the gypsum and citric acid blend. Next make 3 tea bags out of the pieces cheesecloth and add the grains. Allow the mixture to cook at a low boil for 1 hour. Next remove from the heat and add the remaining water to cool the mixture between 70 and 90 degrees F. It's best at 90 degrees F, if you're using a yeast starter. Once your yeast is activated and/or the mixture is at 90 degrees f, pitch your yeast. Allow the mixture to ferment for a minimum of 8 days and then distill.


^ This recipie can be used with just one kind of grain which makes it a "single" whiskey. I also recomend that you soak the grains in warm water for 24 hours. This helps break the grains down into fermentable sugars. I recomend 70 proof (35% ABV) or less because the rye gives it a spicy note. You can try 90 proof (45% ABV) but IMO, that's way too hot for this recipie.
Offline fatboi83  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, April 02, 2014 10:19:11 AM(UTC)
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I have successfully ran 2 batches of it now. 90 proof and it is smooth. Aging some now for a onger period of time to see how the aging affects it.
Offline fatboi83  
#3 Posted : Friday, April 11, 2014 10:03:19 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: heeler Go to Quoted Post
Hey fatboi, how much distillate did you get??? With no sugar added my guess would be very little. What type of still did you use? I know the grains will creat fermentable sugars but I would guess not much. Did you make cuts in your collections?
With the original recipe I bet they were talking about some kind of bakers yeast just cause they want it to be like the old days ya know, but hey if it's good to you there ya go, that ec yeast is a good one too.


I did cheat and put 5 pounds of sugar in it too. With adding the sugar ended up with about 1.25 gallons of 90 proof. Haven't done the full blown all grain, yet, That is next on the list. I do have a 10 gallon wash of single malt that I am running tomorrow. I'll let ya know how that turns out. 12 lbs of golden promise and 8 pounds of simpsons peated barley malt. Smells really good. Can't wait to try it out and then put it in my 2 gallon oak barrel that has been sitting with Olorosso sherry in it for about 2 months now.
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#4 Posted : Tuesday, June 17, 2014 10:39:50 AM(UTC)
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I'm glad you enjoyed it.
Offline Crimbo  
#5 Posted : Saturday, February 02, 2019 5:45:59 PM(UTC)
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Hey guys I have made this recipe a few weeks ago and it turned out great. I think your recipe is not correct though. I am a all grain beer home brewer aswell as distiller and picked up on the mistake right away, If you want to make this recipe the traditional way without cheating by adding sugar. Crush your grains then boil your water and add the rye and corn but leave the malted barley, After it has boiled for 3/4 to 1 hour turn off the heat put a lid on and let it cool to 69 deg c (156 F) then add the 2 row barley. I increased the barley to 1 pound from 1/2 to make sure all the starch from the rye and corn was completely converted to sugars (If you dont want to increase the barley you could just add 2 tsp of amalase at this point. Put the lid back on and wrap it up in a blanket to insulate the pot and leave it for an hour and a half to mash. At this point the grain is no longer needed so drain the liquid off into your fermenter then rinse the grains off with a gallon of boiling water and this should bring you back up closer to 5 gallons, Leave it to cool to 26 deg C (80 F) then take a hydrometer reading and it should be between 1030 and 1040 depending how well the temp held during the mash and your overall efficiency. Next just add your yeast. You should end up with 5 - 6 % abv mash without adding sugar.

I hope this helps those that want to try this recipe the traditional way it was made.
Cheers.
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