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finger lakes highlander  
#1 Posted : Saturday, March 09, 2013 12:54:29 PM(UTC)
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"After my George Washington Rye disaster, I'm trying a rye whiskey again and hopefully, this one will do well. My Sweet Feed whiskey is good, my UJSM is great - working on my 4th generation now, and the Carolina Bourbon (NcHooch's recipe BigGrin) turned out really nice this week. The GW was a total waste and I can't figure out what went wrong - it smelled like puke. Anyway, I found a Rye Whiskey recipe at the Copper Moonshine Still website and it looked fairly easy. It calls for 7 lbs Rye, 2 lbs Barley, 1 lb malt, 6 gallons of water and 1 oz yeast. Heat water to 70 degrees and mix in malt and grain. While stirring the mixture, heat to 160 degrees. Keep mixture at 160 degrees for 2-3 hours, stirring, to convert starch to fermenaible sugars. Strain the mash and place into your fermenter and allow to cool to 70 - 80 degrees. Pitch yeast. To avoid secondary fermentation and contamination, add 1 gram of ammonium flouride. Stir for one minute, then cover and seal with an airlock. Mash will take 5-7 days to ferment. After fermentation is complete, pour into the still through a pillow case to remove all solids.

I made a few modifications - first I used all malted grains, no flaked grains as I did for the GW disaster. I poured 4 gallons of water into my big pot, added the malt and grains and heated the mash to 150. I held it there for 90 minutes, stirring every 15 minutes. I did the Iodine test at the end of 90 minutes and it showed that all of the starches had been converted to sugars. I strained the the mash and into the fermenter, rinsing the grains with the two gallons of water I held in reserve. I topped the fermenter with more water so I have 6 gallons in my fermenter. By this time, the temperature had dropped to 94 degrees. I checked the specific gravity and found it was 1.040. I added 3 lbs of sugar to my wash to raise the starting SG to 1.080. I pitched Red Star champagne yeast and put the top on the fermenter with an air lock. Within an hour, fermentation had started and it is now going quite strong 4 hours later.

It looks like I have plenty of malted grains working for me in this case, so I think it should turn out well. I'll keep everyone posted. If it does work, I probably will go back and give George another try, only I will be using whole / cracked grains, not flaked.
Highlander Cool"
Offline Bushy  
#2 Posted : Saturday, March 09, 2013 6:43:11 PM(UTC)
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"Hi Finger Lakes, did I read correctly that you checked your SG at 94 degrees? The meters are calibrated for 60 degrees. You can take SG readings at any temp other than 60 degrees but then have to either calculate or use a conversion chart to find the correct SG.

But sounds like you have the makeings for a good mash.

Good Luck on this one."
finger lakes highlander  
#3 Posted : Sunday, March 10, 2013 6:00:18 AM(UTC)
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Yes, I adjusted for the 94 degree temperature - actually at 94, it was 1.010 so with the +4 according to the chart I used, it really was 1.050, but I raised it to 1.080 anyway. The fermentation is going very strong this morning - can't wait for it to be ready to run! Thanks, Bushy!
finger lakes highlander  
#4 Posted : Friday, March 15, 2013 11:30:14 AM(UTC)
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I'm not having good luck with my rye attempts! This mash was 1.000 when I racked it yesterday, so I decided to run it today (PSII, 2 inch running it pot-still mode, with one roll of copper packing). I was a bit surprised that it fermented so quickly, but the final SG was 1.000, so I should be getting approx 10% alcohol from the six-gallons of liquid in this run. Well...I ran it slowly, trying for a good pot-still run. The initial reading for alcohol content was 96proof - waaaaaay below what I usually get for a pot-still initial reading in the upper 140s. So after collecting two pints, I decided to turn up the heat and turn this run into a stripping run and will save what I get and run it again as a liquor run, adding another stripping run to it to increase the volume.
If anyone out there has any idea what went wrong, please give me your ideas. My recipe was from the Copper Moonshine Still website and I followed what I stated in my first post above. IF I've left any other information out that is needed for a good analysis, please let me know.
Thanks!!!
Highlander
p.s. I'm going to look for a good rye recipe in the Brewhaus forum and in the "tried and true" in the Home Distiller forum.
Offline muadib2001  
#5 Posted : Friday, March 15, 2013 3:15:38 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: finger lakes highlander Go to Quoted Post
Yes, I adjusted for the 94 degree temperature - actually at 94, it was 1.010 so with the +4 according to the chart I used, it really was 1.050, but I raised it to 1.080 anyway. The fermentation is going very strong this morning - can't wait for it to be ready to run! Thanks, Bushy!

Actually, my hydrometer chart reads between +.0047 and +.0051 at 94 degrees. Just sayin'
finger lakes highlander  
#6 Posted : Saturday, March 16, 2013 1:47:10 AM(UTC)
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Muadib - I think you are correct. I went back to the chart I used in Smiley's book and looked again. I see that it really was 1.010 plus .004 (1.014) and not the 1.050 I had used. Oh well...live and learn. Thank you for pointing that out. I was totally lost in how I went wrong.

Question for you - can I still use the wash I ran yesterday (I still have it) if I aerate it, add sugar and add another packet of yeast?
Offline muadib2001  
#7 Posted : Saturday, March 16, 2013 3:28:40 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: finger lakes highlander Go to Quoted Post
Question for you - can I still use the wash I ran yesterday (I still have it) if I aerate it, add sugar and add another packet of yeast?

I'm not sure. I know that the UJSM process uses a portion of backset for the next generation ferment, but I'm not certain what it would taste like using all backset.
finger lakes highlander  
#8 Posted : Saturday, March 16, 2013 3:55:05 AM(UTC)
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I think I'll just dump the lot and start again - chalk it up to a learning experience. Thanks for your help Muadib!
:)
finger lakes highlander  
#9 Posted : Tuesday, January 21, 2014 12:53:14 PM(UTC)
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Well, here I am "starting again". This time I used Ian Smiley's rye whiskey recipe using flaked rye, malted rye and a little malted barley. The mash was super-think because of the flaked rye - a real "porridge". After mashing according to Smiley's directions, I strained the flaked stuff out and found my wash to be really "gummy" - obviously the malted rye and malted barley wasn't enough. I let it "rest" overnight and then reheated the wash to 160 and added 2 lbs of crushed malted 6-row barley and let it rest for about two hours, holding the temperature between 149F and 151F. I strained the barley out and sparged it, getting a much less gummy wash. My SG was 1.040. so I added about 5 lbs of sugar to the wash to raise the SG to 1.080. When the wash cooled to just under 90F, I pitched a packet of Prestige Whiskey Yeast and by the next morning, fermentation was going very steadily. That started on January 15th and it is still fermenting steadily, although no-where near the strength it was for the first few days. I'm planning to rack it into a carboy to let it finish fermenting and the settle out. When I'm ready to distill, I'll report back with my ending SG. I'm hopeful about this recipe and how it is working, but I think I said that before :)
Offline heeler  
#10 Posted : Wednesday, January 22, 2014 3:07:47 AM(UTC)
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"Little advice...leave it right where it is, in the original fermenter. If it is indeed going as strong and it sounds like it is then why bother it?

You mentioned that the ferment power has slowed down - not as strong as the first few days..thats normal, again my advice is leave it where it is, it wont be BETTER by racking it somewhere else. It will finish and settle just fine right there."
Offline heeler  
#11 Posted : Wednesday, January 22, 2014 3:10:51 AM(UTC)
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Oh one more thing....I would bet that other site said it would be finished fermenting and ready to run in 5-7 days, right?? Well give it 12-15 days so it can settle and finish for sure. If its a little cooler where you are then it may not even be bubbleing in the airlock but it may still not be done. A little more time is better than not enough.---IMHO........
finger lakes highlander  
#12 Posted : Wednesday, January 22, 2014 6:35:02 AM(UTC)
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Thanks for the advice, Heeler! I will leave it as you suggest. I really want this to work. I usually leave my mashes/washes alone so they can stop fermenting on their own - about two weeks. I'm used to making wine, so letting something sit and bubble is no problem for me.
finger lakes highlander  
#13 Posted : Friday, February 07, 2014 12:52:29 PM(UTC)
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I ran the rye the other day and it is a good whiskey! My yield was 6 pints - I saved 5 of them and they are aging on Jack Daniels smoking chips. The color is a rich gold already after just two days. I cut the proof to 120 for the aging process. Finally, I have a success with rye! I will do more of this recipe, although it will be all grain instead of flaked grains as Smiley calls for - I find flaked grains too messy to work with.
Offline Ellcesnd  
#14 Posted : Tuesday, December 27, 2016 8:10:21 AM(UTC)
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What was your ingredient list for the smiley recipe?
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