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Offline klinger  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:54:37 PM(UTC)
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This might be a question that is asked over and over.. However I have not seen it.. Can you age in a plastic bucket w/ chard oak?
Offline heeler  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, January 18, 2012 7:30:05 AM(UTC)
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Not really a good idea. Ethanol is a solvent of sorts. But.....gas cans are plastic these days but I dont really want to store my hooch in a gas can so I think its up to you. Not for me though.
Offline klinger  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, January 18, 2012 9:23:52 AM(UTC)
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ok, short of buying 5 gal wooden kegs. or allot of gallon pickle jars any sugestion?
Offline div4gold  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, January 18, 2012 10:45:46 AM(UTC)
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If you need a big container you could try one of the glass carboys. Or the one gallon glass jugs work.
Offline heeler  
#5 Posted : Thursday, January 19, 2012 3:12:56 AM(UTC)
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"Quart jars are the prefered container for aging. Now you say well I want to age 10 gallons of hooch. Thats not impossible but once you really get to running and cooking and gathering a mass of hooch, you'll see that a gallon of finished and cut likker took one hellofalotta work to amass. It can be done but if ya only get 2.5 qts from a 5 gallon run then math says that a 5 gallon jug of hooch to age is gonna be ??????? a 50 gallon wash roughly. Then if you run it again to double distill, its even less to age --- man thats a long cookout.
If you age in pint jars you can flavor each with someting alittle different, and if one is not to your likking your not tossing out a 5 gallon jug cause it sucks."
Offline BlueSpiritDave  
#6 Posted : Thursday, January 19, 2012 3:22:16 AM(UTC)
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"I like to use 3 gallon glass carboys (glass water bottles) for aging my stuff that I am not experimenting with. After 6/ 25 litre mashes for grain whisky I have almost 3 gallons now on oak chips. That's almost 40 gallons of mash and two still runs (strip then sprit) that yields only 3 gallons. But it is worth the work.

I never ever let my full strength stuff touch plastic, let alone sit on it for months. Hope that helps."
Offline BlueSpiritDave  
#7 Posted : Thursday, January 19, 2012 3:26:34 AM(UTC)
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You can get glass carboys from beer and wine places. I use the 3 gallon ones because the 5, 6, and 6.5 gallon jugs are too big for an old fart like me to lift and shake every other day. Sad
Offline David_Allen  
#8 Posted : Wednesday, October 10, 2012 4:36:12 AM(UTC)
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"
Originally Posted by: heeler Go to Quoted Post
Quart jars are the prefered container for aging. Now you say well I want to age 10 gallons of hooch. Thats not impossible but once you really get to running and cooking and gathering a mass of hooch, you'll see that a gallon of finished and cut likker took one hellofalotta work to amass. It can be done but if ya only get 2.5 qts from a 5 gallon run then math says that a 5 gallon jug of hooch to age is gonna be ??????? a 50 gallon wash roughly. Then if you run it again to double distill, its even less to age --- man thats a long cookout.
If you age in pint jars you can flavor each with someting alittle different, and if one is not to your likking your not tossing out a 5 gallon jug cause it sucks.


I think its important to note that alcohol sitting in a glass jar by itself isn't aging. You could leave it there a thousand years and not notice a difference when you opened it. If you've got some oak chips in that jar - it will get flavor and mellow the alcohol!

Why would you toss it? Run it back through the still and start over!"
Offline John Barleycorn  
#9 Posted : Thursday, October 11, 2012 1:04:52 AM(UTC)
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"This thread is a bit dated ...

Originally Posted by: David_Allen Go to Quoted Post
I think its important to note that alcohol sitting in a glass jar by itself isn't aging. You could leave it there a thousand years and not notice a difference when you opened it.
Hi David,

That might depend on the jar. :) I'm going to disagree with you on this ... although we may be talking apples and oranges here.

I consistently notice a profile change in my neutrals right around the 4 - 6 week time frame ... and I only use closed glass containers with just the distillate. I can't say that I've noticed any changes beyond that ... but then again, a given batch never lasts much longer than several months. :)

There are some references that say it's not uncommon for vodka manufacturers to ""age"" their product for about six weeks (in SS or glass lined vats) _before_ they bottle. The references caught my eye since the time frame was curiously similar to what I was observing. But they offer no explanations as to why. So I still haven't found any definitive explanation for the change.

I have also come across various posts, etc. that mention the effects of oxidation. Ignoring everything but the pure Ethanol, you can still end up with some acetaldehyde and/or acetic acid due to oxidation. The presence of various esters/fusels simply add to the possibilities.

Anyway, there's an awful lot crazy chemistry that can occur ... with or without oak.

Regards,
--JB"
Offline MDH  
#10 Posted : Wednesday, October 17, 2012 10:23:34 AM(UTC)
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"
Originally Posted by: John Barleycorn Go to Quoted Post
This thread is a bit dated ...

Hi David,

That might depend on the jar. :) I'm going to disagree with you on this ... although we may be talking apples and oranges here.

I consistently notice a profile change in my neutrals right around the 4 - 6 week time frame ... and I only use closed glass containers with just the distillate. I can't say that I've noticed any changes beyond that ... but then again, a given batch never lasts much longer than several months. :)

There are some references that say it's not uncommon for vodka manufacturers to ""age"" their product for about six weeks (in SS or glass lined vats) _before_ they bottle. The references caught my eye since the time frame was curiously similar to what I was observing. But they offer no explanations as to why. So I still haven't found any definitive explanation for the change.

I have also come across various posts, etc. that mention the effects of oxidation. Ignoring everything but the pure Ethanol, you can still end up with some acetaldehyde and/or acetic acid due to oxidation. The presence of various esters/fusels simply add to the possibilities.

Anyway, there's an awful lot crazy chemistry that can occur ... with or without oak.

Regards,
--JB



The French age Eau de Vie and the Japanese their Shochu for up to two years in stainless steel or glass.

The Japanese marketing hook appears to be the location where the product is aged, such as ""In a room beside an underground stream where the temperature is only 11 degrees to soften the spirit"" (This is what was translated to me by a Japanese friend).

I was told by a whisky enthusiast (And great story teller) called Brian (At Shelter Point Distillery in Canada) Scotch distillers have placed identical casks placed in entirely different places because of small faults in the barrel that allow the angel's share to escape and other compounds to come in - it doesn't go only one way. The result is two profiles from the same product. Similarly, try finding a very strong smelling old oak or chestnut cabinet - a well oxidized one - and place a very loosely capped bottle of Vodka in it. You will find after several years it deeply absorbs the taste of the inside of the cabinet!

Air aging does many things other than simply allow any missed heads to float away. It actually garuntees new tastes that may be good or bad depending on where you put the spirit."
Offline GinGinGin  
#11 Posted : Tuesday, February 12, 2013 5:40:22 AM(UTC)
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"
Originally Posted by: klinger Go to Quoted Post
This might be a question that is asked over and over.. However I have not seen it.. Can you age in a plastic bucket w/ chard oak?


I use plastic buckets, but I have heard the trick is to buy chemically safe bucket, that are resteraunt grade. I found mine at resteraunt supply store. I would not use the Home Depot bucket. Haha.
The other commenters are right ethenol will eat some plastics, found this out when a bottling wand nearly disintegrated on me. As I understand it, the ethenol pulls a chemical out of the plastic which makes it soft and flexable resulting in a brittle plastic which shaders, i.e. disintegrates or cracks."
Offline jkru  
#12 Posted : Thursday, February 14, 2013 12:57:42 AM(UTC)
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"New guys take....

I live near a winery and was talking to the guy in charge ( whatever you call him) and he said that glass doesnt work so well because it does not allow for evaporation. Which must somehow add to the flavor by taking off the harsher tastes or something. I looked on the internet and found some 1.3 gallon barrels for around 39 bucks. I havent tried my product yet but the color is awesome. I wish Bh would get their good barrels back although they are expensive."
Offline John Barleycorn  
#13 Posted : Thursday, February 14, 2013 1:08:59 AM(UTC)
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There's evaporation and then there's oxidation ... it's not the same thing ... hence the headroom when aging in glass along with an occasional (short) airing.
Offline heeler  
#14 Posted : Thursday, February 14, 2013 1:58:52 AM(UTC)
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"
Originally Posted by: GinGinGin Go to Quoted Post
I use plastic buckets, but I have heard the trick is to buy chemically safe bucket, that are resteraunt grade. I found mine at resteraunt supply store. I would not use the Home Depot bucket. Haha.
The other commenters are right ethenol will eat some plastics, found this out when a bottling wand nearly disintegrated on me. As I understand it, the ethenol pulls a chemical out of the plastic which makes it soft and flexable resulting in a brittle plastic which shaders, i.e. disintegrates or cracks.


Not sure I'm still on the same page...are you saying that you age your finished product or likker in plastic buckets????? And why on earth would you do that???
I would bet you never learned that on this forum, plz go buy some glass of any shape you desire and store and age in that."
Offline chooch  
#15 Posted : Thursday, February 14, 2013 7:59:38 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: John Barleycorn Go to Quoted Post
There's evaporation and then there's oxidation ... it's not the same thing ... hence the headroom when aging in glass along with an occasional (short) airing.


So if you are aging a half gallon in a 1 gallon jug with oak that would be exceptible?
Offline John Barleycorn  
#16 Posted : Friday, February 15, 2013 2:57:58 AM(UTC)
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That should be fine. You could probably fill it to just uner the shoulder of the jug.
Offline AAIndigo  
#17 Posted : Saturday, May 25, 2013 12:08:48 AM(UTC)
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"I'm looking at a 1L oak barrel http://www.barrelsonline...m/ShowProduct.aspx?ID=42 and I was wondering if there comes a time when the barrel no longer gives offf the flavors one wants? Do I need to replace them after a time?

Archie"
Offline poppy-cob  
#18 Posted : Monday, December 02, 2013 6:27:59 PM(UTC)
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"
Originally Posted by: AAIndigo Go to Quoted Post
I'm looking at a 1L oak barrel http://www.barrelsonline...m/ShowProduct.aspx?ID=42 and I was wondering if there comes a time when the barrel no longer gives offf the flavors one wants? Do I need to replace them after a time?

Archie
I'm on my 30th or so batch and I've now aged in charred oak barrels twice and there is a difference...they are 5L barrels and gets filled with 130 to 140 proof........the first time was 3 months, color med dark and my taster friends said it taste just like Wild Turkey.......second aging in same barrel was not as dark but taste was much mellower. I've read that some of the big boys only used second run barrels.......I know that some tequilla runs 10 times in the same barrel.
I get my barrels out of Mexico and as long as you cure them right the work great, IMO"
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