logo                   
Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

Login


Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
Offline fatboi83  
#1 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 6:09:05 AM(UTC)
fatboi83


Rank: Junior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 11/6/2013(UTC)
Posts: 42

Made an all grain scotch. 19 lbs golden promise and 1 lb of peated malt. Mashed and did the iodine test. conversion complete. cooled it down to 80 degrees and pitched 2 vials of the Scottish ale yeast. going on 48 hours now and still no bubbling in the bubbler. How long does it take this stuff to start working?Confused
Offline dieselduo  
#2 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 6:33:19 AM(UTC)
dieselduo


Rank: Senior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 1/24/2012(UTC)
Posts: 630

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 13 time(s) in 13 post(s)
what was the OG and PH ?
Offline dieselduo  
#3 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 6:40:50 AM(UTC)
dieselduo


Rank: Senior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 1/24/2012(UTC)
Posts: 630

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 13 time(s) in 13 post(s)
if everything was good you must have some bad yeast. Try making a starter and see if it works
Offline fatboi83  
#4 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 6:46:39 AM(UTC)
fatboi83


Rank: Junior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 11/6/2013(UTC)
Posts: 42

Originally Posted by: dieselduo Go to Quoted Post
what was the OG and PH ?


I've done this recipe several times with dry yeast and it worked fine. Never checked the OG or PH though.
Offline fatboi83  
#5 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 6:48:45 AM(UTC)
fatboi83


Rank: Junior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 11/6/2013(UTC)
Posts: 42

Originally Posted by: dieselduo Go to Quoted Post
if everything was good you must have some bad yeast. Try making a starter and see if it works


How do I do that? I've done water and sugar for my dry yeast, and this is my first time using liquid yeast. What do I need to do?
Offline dieselduo  
#6 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 6:51:56 AM(UTC)
dieselduo


Rank: Senior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 1/24/2012(UTC)
Posts: 630

Thanks: 1 times
Was thanked: 13 time(s) in 13 post(s)
Here's a link to making a liquid yeast starter. http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter6-5.html
Offline admin  
#7 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 7:03:19 AM(UTC)
admin


Rank: Administration

Reputation:

Groups: Administrators
Joined: 2/10/2002(UTC)
Posts: 490

Was thanked: 7 time(s) in 7 post(s)
I was not even thinking about this being a liquid yeast. There are plenty of places for failure. If the yeast is not refrigerated at all times then it will die. This means during transportation from the manufacturer to the distributor, the distributor to the store, and while at the store. Dry yeast is 'sleeping', and has a much higher tolerance to temperatures. Liquid yeast is just dormant, but still extremely susceptible to changes. That includes pitching it into a warm wash. A change of more than 10-15 degrees can potentially shock and kill the yeast, so if it is not allowed to warm slowly to room temperature before pitching, it can die from thermal shock. Liquid yeast also has a very short shelf life (usually a maximum of around six months). If it was near the BBE date, or any of the above issues has been realized, you likely have dead yeast.
Offline fatboi83  
#8 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 7:20:57 AM(UTC)
fatboi83


Rank: Junior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 11/6/2013(UTC)
Posts: 42

Originally Posted by: Admin Go to Quoted Post
I was not even thinking about this being a liquid yeast. There are plenty of places for failure. If the yeast is not refrigerated at all times then it will die. This means during transportation from the manufacturer to the distributor, the distributor to the store, and while at the store. Dry yeast is 'sleeping', and has a much higher tolerance to temperatures. Liquid yeast is just dormant, but still extremely susceptible to changes. That includes pitching it into a warm wash. A change of more than 10-15 degrees can potentially shock and kill the yeast, so if it is not allowed to warm slowly to room temperature before pitching, it can die from thermal shock. Liquid yeast also has a very short shelf life (usually a maximum of around six months). If it was near the BBE date, or any of the above issues has been realized, you likely have dead yeast.

I opened the fermenter barrel and the day after I pitched the yeast, it stunk like somebody puked in there. Is that a good sign? I've never taken the lid off my fermenter once I pitched the yeast, so I don't have any experience to relate to the smell.
Offline John Barleycorn  
#9 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 9:30:31 AM(UTC)
John Barleycorn


Rank: Senior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 1/12/2012(UTC)
Posts: 804

Was thanked: 5 time(s) in 5 post(s)
"It sounds like you have an infection.

What was your batch size? If it was anything less than about 8 gallons (and your mash was reasonably efficient) your OG should be well north of 1.075 or so. I highly recommend a starter for a big beer ... especially with a liquid yeast. Without a starter it could take a while for your primary fermentation to begin. The high gravity just slows things way down.

You can make a simple starter with a half gallon of water and a half pound of DME (with some yeast nutrients) in a gallon jug ... nothing complicated. Just maintain sanitary conditions ... same as always (boil the water, sanitize the jug, etc. etc.). Get your starter going 48 hour prior to pitching to the primary. You should probably start a bit warm (74 F or so). Once the starter fermentation is underway, let it cool to normal temps for the yeast strain (for WLP028??? ... that would be somewhere in the 65 F - 70 F range). Swirl the starter a few times each day. This should bring the yeast count up enough to handle a big beer without any trouble."
Offline fatboi83  
#10 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 10:16:30 PM(UTC)
fatboi83


Rank: Junior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 11/6/2013(UTC)
Posts: 42

Originally Posted by: John Barleycorn Go to Quoted Post
It sounds like you have an infection.

What was your batch size? If it was anything less than about 8 gallons (and your mash was reasonably efficient) your OG should be well north of 1.075 or so. I highly recommend a starter for a big beer ... especially with a liquid yeast. Without a starter it could take a while for your primary fermentation to begin. The high gravity just slows things way down.

You can make a simple starter with a half gallon of water and a half pound of DME (with some yeast nutrients) in a gallon jug ... nothing complicated. Just maintain sanitary conditions ... same as always (boil the water, sanitize the jug, etc. etc.). Get your starter going 48 hour prior to pitching to the primary. You should probably start a bit warm (74 F or so). Once the starter fermentation is underway, let it cool to normal temps for the yeast strain (for WLP028??? ... that would be somewhere in the 65 F - 70 F range). Swirl the starter a few times each day. This should bring the yeast count up enough to handle a big beer without any trouble.


It was 19 pounds of Golden promise, and 1 pound of simpson's peated malt. enough to make a 10 gallon batch. The iodine stayed red, so I got good conversion. After all my worrying, when I got home and checked it, the bubbler was just chugging right along. They say that patience is a virtue. Never been very patient.:) The yeast was the Scottish ale yeast from white labs, not sure of the number. Thanks for all the replies.
Offline fatboi83  
#11 Posted : Friday, August 22, 2014 10:21:26 PM(UTC)
fatboi83


Rank: Junior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 11/6/2013(UTC)
Posts: 42

"Mr. Barleycorn,
Once I have the starter going, do I add my liquid yeast to that before I pitch it into the primary? This is all uncharted waters for me, I am just trying to expand my knowledge base, so please forgive me if my questions sound stupid."
Offline John Barleycorn  
#12 Posted : Saturday, August 23, 2014 3:49:31 AM(UTC)
John Barleycorn


Rank: Senior Member

Reputation:

Groups: Registered
Joined: 1/12/2012(UTC)
Posts: 804

Was thanked: 5 time(s) in 5 post(s)
"Correct. The ""starter"" is just a mini-fermentation at a lower gravity along with a little bit of nutrients. It's basically a small sugar wash. The only purpose is to increase the size of the yeast colony so it's better prepared to handle the higher gravity of the wort in your primary.

Keep the gravity of your starter low-ish (one pound DME/LME per gallon is fine) and maintain your sanitary practices. I always bring things to a boil, cover it with a lid then let it sit about 10 minutes before placing the pot in a cold water bath in the kitchen sink. You can change the sink water out and swirl the pot around (with the lid on) every few minutes to help it cool faster. From there it goes into a sanitized 1 gallon jug where I shake the daylights out of it every so often (to aerate) while I let the liquid yeast warm up (see the directions on the vial). Finally, just add the yeast to the jug, lock it down and let it ferment (48 hours is plenty).

After 48 you'll have a much larger colony & should see the yeast bed forming on the bottom. When you're ready to add the starter to the primary, swirl the starter around to make sure everything is suspended then add the works to the primary ... it's really just a big vial of liquid yeast. :)

Anyway, that's what I do for my big beers (imperial stouts/porters). Nothing fancy or complicated. I get the starter going two days prior to brew day so it's ready to go once the wort is chilled."
Users browsing this topic
Guest (4)
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.