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Thread: Sugar Wash

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    35

    Default Sugar Wash

    Hello All
    I have a question about my sugar wash??
    I have been using turbo yeast and suger for my wash and it has always taken about 7 days to stop bubbling out the air lock
    But now it is winter here so I am using a heat belt on the bucket and it is staying about 72* to 76* but it has been going for 9 days now and still bubbling away???
    Did I do something wrong????? Or after 9 days should I just stop it???
    I have been using a little one gal. pot still....But I ordered and now have a new 8.5 gal. reflux still and this is driving me nuts...I want to use my new still

    Thanks to all

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    sunny south
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    Default

    Cold will definitely slow down your ferment.

    Taste it (don't swollow). How much sweetness remains? If it's dry (like dry wine), it's done.

    Maybe Co2 traped under the trub is escaping (maybe not)?

    If you can't stand the wait any longer then run it. Just don't overcharge the boiler.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    35

    Default

    THANK YOU FOR YOUR REPLY LWTCS
    I still am having trouble this has never happen to me before
    After 10 days it was still bubbling away so I put in my two part settling agent and tested the wash this morning and it shows 0% alcoholl??
    Any help here
    Thank

  4. #4

    Default

    What are you testing with? If you are taking a reading with your hydrometer, then the 0% is the Potential Alcohol. In other words, the remaining potential is 0%. With a sugar wash and turbo yeast you should get below 0% / 1.000 SG, but it can also depend on many factors.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
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    35

    Default

    Hi
    I am using a test jar and a alcohol meter. My sugar wash has alway tested about 14 to 16% alcohol when it is done in about 7 days, but the time it just kept going and going so I stop it and tested it and the alcohol meter read less than 0% acolhol about -5%???
    Thanks for the reply

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    sunny south
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    Default

    Taste it......

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    High up Hills, WNC< Occupied South
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    817

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LWTCS View Post
    Taste it......
    Ditto. And if after a qt. or 2 you get blasted, you know its ready to run. HA!

    Just kidding of course. But taste will tell you.

    You are useing the wrong instrument. Thats only for distilled product. Get a vineometer sp. thats made for fermenting. Or just taste it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    sunny south
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnwalker2 View Post
    Ditto. And if after a qt. or 2 you get blasted, you know its ready to run. HA!

    Just kidding of course. But taste will tell you.

    You are useing the wrong instrument. Thats only for distilled product. Get a vineometer sp. thats made for fermenting. Or just taste it.
    Instruments are always good to have to make reference while talkin bout likker makin. (example)My wash was this, so I did that. My sprit comes off the still at such and such if I keep my cooling bucket at such and such. And so forth and so on.

    But if one only depends on their instruments, then they never get to understand their likker. For all the help the instruments offer, an equal amount of handycap must be endured.

    Try to wean yourself from your instruments when ever posssible. Or at the very least, cross check your instruments with Taste smell and feel.

    I fully appreciate the ruflux guy's needing those measurements do to the nature of their equipment.

  9. #9

    Default

    That is perfectly normal. An alcoholmeter measures only distilled spirits. The meter is very sensitive. Any unfermented sugar, carbohydrates, etc., increase the density of this liquid, causing the meter to float higher, giving an incorrect low reading.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    High up Hills, WNC< Occupied South
    Posts
    817

    Default

    Yes, I totally agree about the distilling run, but when working with the ferments, the OG and FG are important especially if doing all grain mashes and brandies. Not imperative i agree, but dang sight easier to know for sure where you are at. Is ferment totally finished for what you are makeing. Some like some sugars left, and others want totally dry. Did your mash work? Etc. the hydrometer for wines is a good tool to have. If you are really experianced taste will tell, especially for neutral washes. Can work for brandies and grains also, but that takes a very discerning and educated nose and taste.

    What the heck, they are cheap.

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